Pelvic Pain - Minimally Invasive Pain Surgery | Pain Surgeons | Dallas, Texas – The Minimally Invasive Spine InstituteMinimally Invasive Pain Surgery | Pain Surgeons | Dallas, Texas – The Minimally Invasive Spine Institute  

Pelvic Pain

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Pelvic Pain

Pelvic pain is a symptom that can affect both women and men. The pain may indicate the existence of poorly understood conditions that likely represent abnormal psychoneuromuscular function. Acute pain is most common, often experienced by patients after surgery or other soft tissue traumas. It tends to be immediate, severe and short lived. On the other hand, pain that extends beyond a normal recovery period and lasts longer than 3–6 months constitutes chronic pain

SYMPTOMS

Doctors don’t really understand all the things that can cause chronic pelvic pain. So sometimes, even with a lot of testing, the cause remains a mystery. This doesn’t mean that there isn’t a cause or that your pain isn’t real.

Sometimes, after a disease has been treated or an injury has healed, the affected nerves keep sending pain signals. This is called neuropathic pain. It may help explain why it can be so hard to find the cause of chronic pelvic pain.

FEMALE

Most women, at some time in their lives, experience pelvic pain. As girls enter puberty, pelvic or abdominal pain becomes a frequent complaint.

According to the CDC, Chronic pelvic pain (CPP) accounted for approximately 9% of all visits to gynecologists in 2007. In addition, CPP is the reason for 20—30% of all laparoscopies in adults.

MALE

Chronic pelvic pain in men is referred to as Chronic Prostatitis/Chronic Pelvic Pain Syndrome (CP/CPPS) and is also known as chronic nonbacterial prostatitis. Men in this category have no known infection, but do have extensive pelvic pain lasting more than 3 months. There are no standard diagnostic tests; diagnosis is by exclusion of other disease entities. Multimodal therapy is the most successful treatment option, and includes α-blockers, phytotherapy, and protocols aimed at quieting the pelvic nerves through myofascial trigger point release with psychological re-training for anxiety control. Antibiotics are not recommended

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